Open skies

//Open skies

Open skies

Having been traveling back and forth across an ocean and continents in past weeks, I’ve had a good opportunity to expand my direct experience of the world beyond my usual parameters. As ever, all that I needed to do was pay attention to and open to whatever was before me, wherever I found myself. Because I was not in my familiar surroundings, however, that seed practice bore unfamiliar fruit.
I was struck by everything from the airplane that carried me from Paris to New York, surprisingly spacious and living up to its airline’s name, « Open Skies, » to the near-hysteria sweeping America about a feared flu epidemic. I noticed the unfathomable diversity in airports, supermarkets, roads, cars, books, magazines, newspapers, fruit and vegetables, fish, bread, traffic signs, rules, laws, shoes, clothing, laughter, anger, courtesy, greetings, broadcast news, post offices, doctor’s offices, restaurant menus and service, currencies, advertisements, relations to space and time… And yet, amid the myriad changing forms, across borders, beyond local languages, styles and tastes, there remained what I can’t name, what I know by not knowing, what is shared, what is unseen, unspoken, unborn, undying… I must use the three dots because, as the American Zen teacher Eve Marko wrote recently, I don’t know any beginning without an end, and I’d add that I don’t know any end without a beginning…
And so. Now here I am. Home again, the clock advancing, waiting late in a gray afternoon for a heavy snowfall we’ve been told is on its way.
The headlines tell of chaos, violence, uncertainty, fear, the three enduring « fires » of greed, anger, ignorance/delusion. Looks like hard times everywhere we turn. How do I, do we, face that, I wonder? For me, the « how » is not a solution, it is a way: May we go forth not with denial, fear, rejection, violence, but with patience and an open, loving heart.

By | 2017-04-04T06:58:15+01:00 janvier 18th, 2013|Textes|5 Comments

About the Author:

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Enseignante Zen et poète, Sensei Amy “Tu es cela” Hollowell est née et a grandi à Minneapolis, aux Etats-Unis. Arrivée en France en 1981 pour étudier la littérature et l’histoire, elle y est restée, s’installant à Paris, où elle élève ses deux enfants et gagne sa vie en tant que journaliste. The Zen teacher and poet Amy “Tu es cela” Hollowell Sensei was born and raised in Minneapolis, but came to France in 1981 to study literature and history and has lived in Paris ever since, raising her two children and making a living as a journalist.

5 Comments

  1. fakes uhren 23 juillet 2013 at 3 h 30 min - Reply
  2. Christine 20 janvier 2013 at 22 h 34 min - Reply

    Open skies, snowfall and open hearts… lots of snow here south of Paris and everybody was out in the streets today, adults and children both playing like kids and sharing an ambiance of joy and connectedness. without changing places, just unusual weather conditions created an atmosphere of being in this all together.

  3. tu es cela 20 janvier 2013 at 19 h 53 min - Reply

    Thank you for reading, Sarah, and writing, and lighting the way, too.

  4. Sarah 19 janvier 2013 at 16 h 29 min - Reply

    thank you Sensei – thank you thank you for lighting (lightening?) the way…

  5. Hugo 18 janvier 2013 at 22 h 10 min - Reply

    "And yet, amid the myriad changing forms, across borders, beyond local languages, styles and tastes, there remained what I can’t name, what I know by not knowing, what is shared, what is unseen, unspoken, unborn, undying… I must use the three dots because, as the American Zen teacher Eve Marko wrote recently, I don’t know any beginning without an end, and I’d add that I don’t know any end without a beginning…"

    My true self?

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